MAD Greens guests react to Texas-sized salad...And they're excited!

BIG NEWS: New ‘Texas-Size' Salads Are Here!

Giant sizing in response to guest demand

As MAD Greens celebrates the upcoming grand opening of our first Texas restaurant at Austin’s The Domain, we have a big...no HUGE announcement to share.

 
Pictured: The new Texas Size salad promotional video that will air live in all major U.S. broadcast markets throughout the month of April.
 
“We introduce new menu items all the time at MAD Greens,” says MAD Greens Co-Founder and Chief Culinary Innovator Dan Long. “But with this announcement, we’re pulling out all the stops. It could be the biggest innovation we’ve made in our 11 year history. It might even be bigger than the biggest. I think it’s safe to say it’s the most ginormous announcement we’ve ever made.”
 
MAD Greens Co-Founder and Chief Culinary Innovator Dan Long announces new 'Texas Size' salads.
Pictured: Dan Long, MAD Greens Co-Founder and Chief Culinary Innovator makes the announcement on national television.
 
So what is this “ginormous” announcement? In honor of the first MAD Greens opening in Texas, we're introducing a ‘Texas Size’ salad option. The size complements our existing ‘regular’ and ‘big’ salad sizing. The new Texas-sized option will include 500 pounds of mixed greens and veggies, 200 pounds of grilled citrus chicken and more than 15 gallons of scratch-made dressing.
 
“For years our guests have been requesting a larger salad size that could feed more people and last longer because of larger portions,” continued Long. “Our extensive focus group testing revealed the Texas-sized salads are large enough to feed 800 people in one sitting. We also discovered the salad helps with cardiovascular health and muscle strengthening because it takes so much effort to carry it. In fact, the entire offensive and defensive line of the Denver Broncos football team have been lifting the salad in off-season workouts and have nothing but great things to say about the Texas-sized salad regimen. We’ve actually started to hand out a complimentary post-workout stretching guide at the register so our guests don’t pull any muscles transporting the salad.”
 
MAD Greens April Fools
Pictured: MAD Greens team members have resorted to using catering carts, wheelbarrows and other wheeled apparatus to transport the new Texas Size salads.
 
Creating a salad of such magnitude wasn’t without its challenges, however. The MAD Greens restaurant Operations Team spent months researching serverware vendors who could create custom-sized salad bowls and utensils that were 5,000 times larger than the industry standard.
 
“It took a while for everything to come together, but we wanted to go above and beyond for our guests so it was worth it. I’m proud to say there’s nothing like it anywhere in the world. This is going to be a fast casual industry game-changer,” concluded Long.
 
MAD Greens April Fools
Pictured: Do you love the regular or big size Don Quixote salad? 'Texas Size' it and enjoy with dozens of your friends! (MAD Greens Catering will even deliver it!)
 
Starting April 1, MAD Greens guests will be able to enjoy a Texas-sized salad at any MAD Greens restaurant. For more information on ingredients or pricing, please visit madgreens.com/menu/salads. And please remember, during or after consuming any Texas-sized salad, MAD Greens may not be held responsible for the following:
 
  • Illness after eating 500 pounds of salad in one sitting
  • Lethargy or loss of consciousness after consuming 15 gallons of salad dressing 
  • Damage to your vehicle after trying to transport a Texas-sized salad back to your home or office
  • Broken bones, sprains or pulled muscles
  • Damage to conference room tables, kitchen tables, counter tops, patio tables or other surfaces
  • Increases in pant size
  • Missing pets or children
  • Car accidents
  • Incidents involving being squished, squashed or stuck beneath Texas-sized salad bowls
 
MAD Greens April Fools
Pictured: A sample of our new Texas Size Salad advertisement that will be running in the New York Times on April 1, 2016.